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WSMH FOX 66 :: News - News at Ten - 'It's not cheating.' Girl Scout told she can't sell cookies to business
'It's not cheating.' Girl Scout told she can't sell cookies to business

SALEM, Ore. -- A 7-year-old Girl Scout
was the top cookie seller last year after selling more than 100 boxes of
cookies to the coffee shop around the corner from her house. She hoped
to sell even more to Bentley’s Coffee Shop this year, but her mom soon
learned Maddie wouldn’t be allowed.



The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington took issue with
Bentley’s Coffee creating a Girl Scout Thin Mint Mocha last year without
the proper licensing permission to use that name. An email from the
organization also explained to Maddie’s mom that it’s against policy for
the business to use the cookies as an ingredient, even if it didn’t use
the brand name.


"It's not cheating," Maddie said. "But he's going to make some drinks out of his own thing."



"We’re just the little guy. We’re trying to have fun and make some good
drinks and help Maddie out in the process, and it just didn’t quite work
out that way,” said Brandon Eastman, owner of Bentley’s Coffee. “So we
just decided to buy a different brand of mint cookies.”



Instead of buying Girl Scout cookies from Maddie, Eastman plans to
donate $1.50 for every box of other mint cookies he uses to make “Mint
Cookie Mochas” this year.



“For a young girl, it’s really important she sees there is not just one way to do things,” Eastman said.



Maddie’s mom, Jamie Hamilton, was thrilled. Eastman planned to donate
money and allow Maddie to set up a stand nearby and encourage customers
to buy Girl Scout cookies, too.



“The biggest message I would love for her to get (from) all of this is
to think outside the box,” Hamilton said. “Move forward and be creative
just like staff at Bentley's has been.”



Then, another unexpected development happened as KATU worked on this
story Monday.  The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington
contacted Maddie’s mom to explain this was all a misunderstanding. A
spokesperson said a volunteer had wrong information.



“Any business that wants to partner with a Girl Scout and sell retail
products, we would love to help them through that process,” said Sarah
Miller, Director of Communications for Girl Scouts of Oregon and
Southwest Washington.


She explained businesses can buy boxes and use them as ingredients in
other products, although they cannot use the Girl Scout brand name. 


“In this situation, it was just a miscommunication. It’s unfortunate,
but we would love to help Bentley’s and help Maddie make it right,”
Miller said.



Maddie’s mom still thinks the organization only changed its mind when the story started getting publicity.



“Unfortunately, we were trying to go about the correct channels, and we
were railroaded with no, no, no, no,” she said. “Staff should be
checking. They have paid staff. If that volunteer is misinformed, maybe
somebody else should be taking over that position.”



Even though Maddie is now allowed to sell cookies to Bentley’s Coffee,
she doesn’t plan on doing that. She and her mom want to stick with the
new plan.



“I am astounded how much community support we’ve already seen,” Maddie’s mom said. “It’s truly touching.”


Bentley's Coffee will be selling the Mint Cookie Mochas starting this Friday at its Salem and Keizer locations.


'It's not cheating.' Girl Scout told she can't sell cookies to business

Wednesday, January 29 2014, 02:15 PM EST

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