WSMH FOX 66 on Facebook WSMH FOX 66 Twitter WSMH FOX 66 RSS Feed WSMH FOX 66 Mailing List
 

FOX 66 News at Ten

WSMH FOX 66 :: News - News at Ten - California egg law gets a legal challenge from Missouri's attorney general
California egg law gets a legal challenge from Missouri's attorney general



JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP)
— Missouri's attorney general has asked a federal court to strike down a
California law regulating the living conditions of chickens, setting up a
cross-country battle that pits new animal protections against the economic
interests of Midwestern farmers.



The lawsuit by Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster takes aim at a California
law set to take effect in 2015 that prohibits eggs from being sold there if
they come from hens raised in cages that don't comply with California's new
size and space requirements.



Koster said Tuesday that the California law infringes on the interstate
commerce protections of the U.S. Constitution by effectively imposing new
requirements on out-of-state farmers.



"If California legislators are permitted to mandate the size of chicken
coops on Missouri farms, they may just as easily demand that Missouri soybeans
be harvested by hand or that Missouri corn be transported by solar-powered
trucks," Koster said.



Missouri's lawsuit was filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Fresno, Calif.



California Attorney General Kamala Harris declined to comment on the suit
Tuesday.



But the Humane Society of the United States, which campaigned for the ballot
initiative, said in a statement that states have the right to pass laws that
protect the health and safety of their residents. Jennifer Fearing, the group's
senior state director for California, said eggs produced from hens in
"battery cages" have a higher risk of salmonella contamination.



"Attorney General Koster's lawsuit targeting California's laws, filed just
to curry favor with big agribusiness, threatens state laws across the country
dealing with agriculture and food safety," she said.



California voters approved a ballot initiative in 2008 that required egg-laying
hens, pigs and calves to be raised with enough space to allow the animals to
lie down, stand up, turn around and fully extend their limbs. The measure gave
farmers until 2015 to comply with the provisions.



After voters approved the initiative, concerns were raised that the measure
would put California egg farmers at a competitive disadvantage with
counterparts in other states.



In 2010, California legislators expanded the law to ban in that state the sale
of eggs from any hens that were not raised in compliance with California's
animal care standards. The California law cites concerns about protecting
people from salmonella and other illnesses.



But the Missouri lawsuit said the real intent was to protect California farmers
from being put at a disadvantage with their counterparts in other states.



U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman, a California Democrat who wrote the legislation when
he was in the state Legislature, also declined to comment Tuesday.



Missouri farmers produce about 1.7 billion eggs annually and sell about one-third
of those — about 540 million eggs — in California, according to Koster's
lawsuit. He said that makes Missouri the second-largest egg exporter to
California, behind only Iowa.



Many of Missouri's hens are raised in tight cages that won't meet California's
new standards. Koster said Missouri farmers would have to spend about $120
million to remodel their cages or forgo sales to one of their most important
markets, which could force some Missouri egg producers out of business.



Farm Sanctuary, an animal rescue and protection group based in Watkins Glen,
N.Y., was among the organizations that helped fund the campaign for the
California ballot initiative.



"It's a real embarrassment for the state of Missouri that Mr. Koster would
defend a practice that is horribly abusive of animals with a legal theory that
is tilting at windmills," said Bruce Friedrich, a senior policy director
at Farm Sanctuary.



Missouri Farm Bureau President Blake Hurst praised the lawsuit as an important
legal challenge. He said the California law, if upheld, could set a precedent
in which the biggest states can effectively set agricultural policies for all
the states.



"A pretty good tradition in this country that's worked pretty well is that
we have free trade among the states, and we would not want to see that
changed," Hurst said.



 



Source: Associated Press  



California egg law gets a legal challenge from Missouri's attorney general

Thursday, February 6 2014, 10:36 AM EST

National News Headlines

San Francisco police shot man 20 times, including 6 in back
An autopsy report shows a young black man shot dead by San Francisco police suffered 20 gunshot wounds, including six in the back, and had drugs in his system when he died in the shooting that sparked protests and calls for the chief's removal.

Restaurant owner, wife charged in deadly Michigan house fire that killed illegal immigrants
Federal officials charged a suburban Detroit restaurant owner and his wife Friday with harboring immigrants who were in the U.S. without legal permission after a fire at a house he owned killed five employees about two weeks earlier.

Sources: FBI investigating Ohio machete attack as possible lone wolf terror act
Law enforcement sources close to the investigation into a machete attack at an Ohio restaurant hold Fox News Friday that federal authorities are investigating the incident as a potential lone wolf terror attack.

Northeast braces for possible 'life-threatening' cold weather
The National Weather Service said Friday the coldest air mass of the winter may hit the Northeast this weekend and New Yorkers are being urged to take notice.

Journos kicked out of Concerned Student 1950 town hall at Mizzou, threatened with arrest
Journalists covering student activism on the campus of the University of Missouri still face a hostile environment.

Police called to home of 'affluenza' teen's dad, no charges
Police said they were called to the residence of "affluenza teen" Ethan Couch's father on Friday to investigate claims that Fred Couch attacked his girlfriend, but she wouldn't cooperate and no charges were filed.

Manhole cover crashes into SUV's windshield, killing driver
A dislodged manhole cover weighing more than 200 pounds went airborne and crashed through an SUV's windshield on a major highway, killing an art teacher as she drove to work during the Friday morning commute, authorities said.

The Latest: Faculty asks university's president to resign
The Latest on the turmoil at Mount St. Mary's University after an uproar over the president's plan to identify freshmen most likely to fail and offer them tuition refunds: 7:20 p.m.

Conan's biggest regret at Harvard? Skipping economics
Conan O'Brien was a prankster during his Harvard years, but he also credits his success to hard work in the classroom.

Alabama woman convicted in girl's running death dies
An Alabama woman convicted of capital murder in the running death of her 9-year-old granddaughter died Friday less than a year into her life-without-parole sentence for the killing.

2 more men charged in Southern jewelry robberies
Two more men accused of participating in a string of jewelry store robberies across the South are facing federal charges in Florida.

Columbine shooter's mother says she thinks of victims daily
The mother of Columbine High School shooter Dylan Klebold says she didn't know anything was wrong with her son before the 1999 attack, and that she thinks about the victims and their families every day.

Texas OKs licensing path for immigrant detention centers
Two of the nation's largest federal immigrant family detention centers can soon apply for residential child care licenses in Texas.

Catholic college reinstating 2 fired professors
The embattled president of a Catholic university in Emmitsburg, Maryland, says he's reinstating two faculty members he fired this week amid an uproar over a plan to identify freshmen most likely to fail and offer them refunds if they chose to leave.

Where did El Nino go? Heat, dry spell stoke drought worry
Where did El Nino go? Ten days with record heat and no rain have Californians worrying about the drought again.

What Moms Really Want for Valentine’s Day
Kids, ditch the flowers, candy, wine. Do your laundry instead!

Gender Neutrality for the Almighty Dollar
Retailers eye profits as most of America is ignored.

Good Kids? Good for You!
Why it pays to let go of the hyperfocus on negatives.

Texas becomes first state to recommend court ban on bite mark evidence
Texas has become the first state to call for a ban on allowing bite mark evidence, which legal experts say is likely to reverberate in courtrooms across the U.S. The Texas Forensic Science Commission formally recommended Friday that judges stop accepting bite mark analysis until the technique is supported by better research.

Restaurant owner charged with harboring illegal immigrants after deadly house fire
Federal officials charged a suburban Detroit restaurant owner and his wife Friday with harboring immigrants who were in the U.S. without legal permission after a fire at a house he owned killed five employees about two weeks earlier.

News at Ten Stories

Advertise with us!
IE6 Float Fix