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Profitt Report: Legitimate work-from-home jobs

Photo credit: MGN

More workers are choosing jobs that allow them to skip the office and work from home. There are a ton of real, well-paying jobs you can do in your pajamas, at home. However, there are also scams that you want to steer clear of.

“Content writer, I have a lot of personal experience with that one,” said Kyle James, founder of the money-saving website, Rather-Be-Shopping.

Running this website is how he makes money.

“Creating content for a blog that either ranks well on Google or gets the attention of brands and they're going to pay you either through digital advertising or sponsored posts,” he said.

Flexibility, avoiding a commute and decent pay are all reasons people might take on a work-from-home job.

“They pretty much all of them make better than minimum wage, some make quite a bit more than that,” James said.

He points out a few these gigs that you may have never even heard of.

“I love the search result evaluator, you go to Google’s career page, do a search for it,” James said, “you look at the results, you make sure there's no spam.”

Spend a ton of time on social media? James said you can put those skills to use.

“Social media consultants, this is really good for college students,” James said, “it might just be as simple as going onto a company’s Facebook page and answering questions people are asking. Or it might be a little more complicated where you're trying to build a buzz around promotion or something.”

With the holidays coming up, companies need help supporting the influx of shoppers both in store but also online.

“Typically, you can work from home, you're helping people with their orders, answering questions. If you don't have really good phone skills, no worries, you can also be a chat operator,” James said.

While you’re looking at these options, keep an eye out for warning signs that something is amiss.

“The red flags to be aware of when looking for an online job or work from home job, they're requiring money up front for materials or they want you to pay them to get trained, those are red flags, stay away,” James said.

Always research a company before signing on. James suggests the website FlexJobs.com, a site that works as a search engine for flexible or telecommuting jobs. They have an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau.

The Profitt Report wants to hear from you - please send consumer questions and story ideas to ProfittReport@WSMH.com

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