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The Latest: Senate leader says insurance changes appear dead

Michigan Legislature in session on last day.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The Latest on the Michigan Legislature's final week of voting for the two-year term (all times local):

12:20 a.m.

An attempt to make changes to Michigan's auto insurance system to curb medical costs in the final days of the two-year legislative term appears to be dead.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof told reporters late Wednesday there was "a pretty good deal going" between insurers and hospitals -- which had been at odds -- but "issues" could not be overcome in the Republican-led House.

The final day of voting this year is Thursday.

Senators adjourned before midnight, with plans to return in the morning. The House remains in session.

Lawmakers continue to seek a compromise on bills that would change energy laws. Gov. Rick Snyder is pushing hard for legislation to be sent to his desk.

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10 p.m.

Michigan lawmakers have again passed wolf-hunting legislation after the current law was declared unconstitutional by the state appeals court.

The Republican-led House voted 69-39 late Wednesday to define wolves as a game species and to authorize the state to designate game. The bill goes to Gov. Rick Snyder.

It's the fourth time lawmakers have considered wolf-hunt laws.

Wolf hunting isn't allowed in Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota under a federal court decision. But proponents of wolf hunting want Michigan positioned if Congress removes wolves from endangered species status.

In 2014, Michigan voters rejected laws allowing wolf hunts. But the votes were symbolic because legislators had approved a third measure.

That law was nixed recently because a provision providing free hunting licenses to military members isn't related to scientifically managing wildlife.

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9:25 p.m.

Utilities would be forced to more quickly warn customers if there is too much lead in their water under legislation approved in Michigan's Legislature and sent to Gov. Rick Snyder.

The bill, which was spurred by Flint's water crisis, would require public water systems to issue a public advisory within three business days of being notified by state regulators that lead exceeds the "action level." The current deadline is 30 days.

The Senate passed the legislation unanimously late Wednesday.

In Flint, one issue was a delay in notifying the public of dangerous levels of lead.

The Legislature has allocated hundreds of millions of dollars toward the crisis, but policy changes have been slow to come.

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9:15 p.m.

Newly passed legislation sent to Gov. Rick Snyder is aimed at further shielding municipalities from lawsuits filed by people who trip and fall on sidewalks.

The bill, approved 22-15 by the Senate Wednesday night, lets cities defend themselves by saying a sidewalk defect is "open and obvious."

Supporters say budget-strapped cities such as Detroit pay millions of dollars annually in sidewalk-injury settlements and should be able to use a defense available to businesses. Critics say the bill effectively make cities entirely immune and removes the incentive to properly maintain sidewalks.

Under law, cities aren't liable unless someone proves the city knew or should have known about the defect at least 30 days before the injury and the unevenness in the walkway is at least 2 inches.

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9 p.m.

Michigan lawmakers are nearing final approval of bills that would make it illegal to collect a fee for fetal tissue in Michigan.

It's already illegal to sell or transfer fetuses and fetal tissue in the state. But majority Republicans say action is needed in the wake of undercover video filed by an anti-abortion group that purported to show Planned Parenthood officials discussing the sale of aborted fetal body parts.

Many Democrats say the bills are unnecessary and duplicative.

The main bill was approved 69-37 Wednesday night and sent back to the Senate for a final vote.

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7:30 p.m.

Legislation that would require Michigan schools to provide CPR instruction to students is nearing Gov. Rick Snyder's desk.

The House passed the bill 98-8 Wednesday night. It returns to the Senate for a final vote in the final days of the two-year term.

The measure would require that schools provide instruction in CPR and the use of defibrillators at least one time between grades 7 and 12. The requirement would begin in the 2017-18 school year.

The instruction could be for hands-only CPR, a simpler type of training that does not require certification or mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. It can be taught in as few as 30 minutes, and the instructor does not need to be a certified CPR trainer.

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7:05 p.m.

The Michigan House has voted to let landlords prohibit medical marijuana patients from growing or smoking the drug on leased residential property.

The bill, which passed 88-17 Wednesday night, was sent back to the Senate for a final concurrence vote in the final days of the two-year session.

The legislation would add another exception to a 2008 voter-approved law that legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes. That law already does not require insurers to reimburse people for medical marijuana, nor does it mandate that employers accommodate employees' use of the drug for medical purposes.

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2:35 p.m.

Michigan lawmakers have given final approval to legislation that would soften "zero-tolerance" expulsion and suspension requirements by inserting what backers say is some common sense into the process.

Bills approved overwhelmingly by the House Wednesday would require school officials to consider certain factors before expelling or suspending students. They include the pupil's age, disciplinary history and whether the misconduct threatened the safety of others.

Other factors would include whether the student has a disability, if a lesser punishment could address the violation and whether "restorative" meetings between the offender and a victim could help.

Bringing a gun to school would remain an automatic expulsion. Backers say too many kids are being harshly disciplined for inadvertently bringing weapons to school.

The legislation goes to Gov. Rick Snyder for his expected signature.

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10:45 a.m.

Michigan lawmakers are poised to finalize legislation that would soften "zero-tolerance" expulsion and suspension requirements by inserting what backers say is some common sense into the process.

Bills up for a final vote Wednesday would require school officials to consider certain factors before expelling or suspending students. They include the pupil's age, disciplinary history and whether his or her actions threatened the safety of others.

Bringing a gun to school would remain an automatic expulsion.

Supporters say minority students are disproportionately affected by expulsion and suspension policies.

Also Wednesday, legislators are preparing for a marathon session as behind-the-scenes wrangling continues on energy bills backed by Gov. Rick Snyder and changes to Michigan's auto insurance system.

Thursday is the last scheduled voting day of the two-year term.

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